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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay On Innocence

Innocence In "To Kill A Mockingbird"

In the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" written by Harper Lee, is a narration by a young girl named Jean-Louise Finch, her nickname is Scout. Her older brother's name is Jem Finch and her father's name is Atticus Finch. Their family resides in the town of Maycomb County, Alabama. The story takes place in the 1930's during The Great Depression. Throughout the novel, Scout re-tells her experiences as a child growing up during an age of racism and oppression. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, it is a sin to kill a mockingbird.

Mockingbirds are innocent creatures. They do not destroy other people's gardens. They do not annoy local residents. They are as innocent as anything in this world comes. Miss Maudie explains to Scout why it is a sin to kill a mockingbird:"Your father's right," she said. "Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don't eat up people's gardens, don't nest in corncribs, they don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." (Lee 90)It is a sin to kill a mockingbird because it is pure evil to destroy innocence. Mockingbirds are innocent things, and it would be a sin to destroy them.

In Harper Lee's novel, Boo Radley is a mockingbird. He is an example of innocence destroyed by evil. This evil is the harsh rumors going around town about him. Jem gives a description of Boo:Boo was about six-and-a-half feet tall, judging from his tracks; he dine on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch, that's why his hands were bloodstained--if you ate an animal raw, you could never wash the blood off. There was a long jagged scar that ran across his face; what teeth he had were yellow and rotten; his eyes popped and he drooled most of the time (Lee 13).

This description is far from true. The evil rumors about him gave him a reputation of a crazy mad killer. But the fact is he is really a nice man that just wants a friend. The reason he only comes out at night...

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While examining the term, "the end of innocence", Scout’s viewpoint on Boo throughout the novel can be an indication of Scout’s own "end of innocence."     

Scout opens the novel with a naive viewpoint on both the world and Boo Radley. At the start of the novel, Scout interprets a raiding on the jail, through an adolescent standpoint. Scout sees the circumstances of the attack from the perspective of a young child. Scout’s responses to situations, such as the one at the jail, attributes to the fact that she is young, and has few life experiences under her belt. Scout plays ludicrous games with Boo and her detachment towards reality shows the immense childishness she possesses. Boo Radley is a…show more content…

Scout seems to have a better understanding of why Boo never comes out and becomes mature about the subject. Scout finally begins to go through the changing process when she witnesses the horrors of the Tom Robinson trial.

At the end of the novel, Scout demonstrates her maturity when she finally is able to distinguish Boo Radely the game, from Boo Radley the man. Scout fantasizes about seeing Boo, and meeting him in the street, to offer comfort and solace. Near the end of the novel, Scout tends to think of Boo in a different way. Scout finally recognizes Boo as a person and she makes connections that she wasn‘t previously able to do. When Scout finally meets Boo, she greets him in a very nonchalant way and the greeting demonstrates the knowledge she acquires during the course of the novel. The way Scout greets Mr. Radley encapsulates everything she learned during the novel. Scout suddenly becomes ladylike and she finally accepts all the dictums that were directed towards her as a child. Scout demonstrates everything she learns, in a polite, short conversation with Mr. Boo Radley.

In a sense, Scout Finch’s transition from innocence to maturity can be followed in three phases. The first phase is Scout’s original disposition. At the beginning of the novel, Scout is naive. Scout fails to recognize logical situations and often takes a childish approach to them. The second phase is the event that causes her to change. Scout witnessing Tom Robinson’s murder trial

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